Monday 24 September 2012

The whole story of ‘Magical Realism’

Magic started unrolling as District Collector K.V. Mohankumar threw a ball to the audience. The first one who caught the ball selected the first writer for telling the first context of the story. The ball was then passed among the audience members who selected more writers. The story flourished enchantingly as each writer added an attractive element. For example, the first author selected by the audience was Kanesh Punur who set the background of the story as Government Arts College, Kozhikode and its girl student. Next chance was Mr. Mohankumar’s. He set four characters, one of whom was a girl named Sainaba. Author K.P. Sudheera added a 19-year-old Manohar to the story stream. When his turn came, writer Akbar Kakkattil invited everyone’s attention to a beautiful bird that used to sit on the windows of the college library. 20-year-old Meenakshi came to the scene when U.K. Kumaran’s creativity worked. U.A. Khader twisted the scene adding that Meenakshi happened to see Sainaba and Manohar talking in the library and the bird sitting on the lap of the guy. Another writer Subhash Chandran said that the bird was set free by the boy. A pinch of fiction found its place as Indu Menon added that the bird was the soul of a Krishna Varma Samorin who died long ago. 
Now the first box kept at the rear of the audience was opened. The banner inside carried all the above sequels exactly written on it. Then the second box that hung on the stage was opened to see an engrossing expansion of the story. The story read like this: Manohar was travelling to Kozhikode public library by train. From the railway station he had to walk as no bike rider offered him a lift. At the library he met Sainaba. They walked out and took a respite at the foot of a teak tree. Meenakshi’s sister saw this. Samorin’s soul in the guise of a bird came and sat on the lap of Manohar. He set free the bird which flew to the infinity…
Mr. Muthukad had successfully performed magical translations of a handful of novel works including ‘Wings of Fire’ by Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, ‘Daivathinte Vikruthikal’ by M. Mukundan and jail days of Vaikkam Mohammed Basheer. These were all presentations based on the contexts described in a published work. But the latest feat stands singular in using the aspects of magic for fast sketching thoughts emerging from writers’ minds.

No comments: